Obsessively Normal

While depression currently seems to be ‘in’ with the media , anxiety disorders continue to be ignored and misunderstood.

quantumaniac:

Olympic Cauldron: Up Close

For many, the Olympic Cauldron was the highlight of last night’s Opening Ceremony for the 2012 Olympics in London. Designed by Thomas Heatherwick, the cauldron represented the climax of the opening ceremony and remained the Olympic’s best-kept secret until last night’s unveiling.

The cauldron featured 204 copper petals, each representing one of the competing nations. The petals were brought to the stadium by each team as part of the athletes’ procession. As each team completed their entrance, they attached a petal to a long pipe in a ring at the centre of the arena.

When the cauldron took centre stage, seven young athletes selected by former British Olympic champions passed the flames from the torches to some of the petals, eventually setting all of them ablaze. The 204 petals then rose simultaneously, forming a giant Olympic torch for all of the world to witness. For full coverage of the opening and closing ceremonies for the 2012 Olympics in London, visit the official website at:olympicopeningceremony.tumblr.com.

quantumaniac:

“The Theory of General Chillativity.”

Enjoy these pictures of Albert Einstein being totally chill. 

sagansense:

Stunning Starry Nights of Lincoln Harrison

Victoria, Australia-based photographer Lincoln Harrison has been taking pictures for just two years. Harrison says his images are created by taking one shot during twilight and then up to 500 shots in complete darkness throughout the night. Harrison says most of his pictures are of star trails and landscapes usually around Lake Eppalock in Victoria, Australia.

“Locations are chosen in pretty much the same way as I would choose landscape locations,” says Harrison. “I just drive or walk around until I see something that looks good.”

After Harrison returns from his night shoot, he processes the image in Adobe Photoshop, stacking the images using the lighten and blend modes, to create his spectacular images. He then adds the twilight image, sometimes shot using HDR (High Dynamic Range) and a combination of layer masks.

His favorite? At the moment Wormhole. You can see more of his incredible images at his website or at 500px.com

We’d like to see your star trails. Send us your photos or post it on our Flickr page.

the-star-stuff:

‘Supermoon’ Alert: Biggest Full Moon of 2012 Occurs This Week
The moon will officially become full Saturday (May 5) at 11:35 p.m. EDT. And because this month’s full moon coincides with the moon’s perigee — its closest approach to Earth — it will also be the year’s biggest.
The moon will swing in 221,802 miles (356,955 kilometers) from our planet, offering skywatchers a spectacular view of an extra-big, extra-bright moon, nicknamed a supermoon.
And not only does the moon’s perigee coincide with full moon this month, but this perigee will be the nearest to Earth of any this year, as the distance of the moon’s close approach varies by about 3 percent, according to meteorologist Joe Rao, SPACE.com’s skywatching columnist. This happens because the moon’s orbit is not perfectly circular.
CREDIT: Tim McCord

the-star-stuff:

‘Supermoon’ Alert: Biggest Full Moon of 2012 Occurs This Week

The moon will officially become full Saturday (May 5) at 11:35 p.m. EDT. And because this month’s full moon coincides with the moon’s perigee — its closest approach to Earth — it will also be the year’s biggest.

The moon will swing in 221,802 miles (356,955 kilometers) from our planet, offering skywatchers a spectacular view of an extra-big, extra-bright moon, nicknamed a supermoon.

And not only does the moon’s perigee coincide with full moon this month, but this perigee will be the nearest to Earth of any this year, as the distance of the moon’s close approach varies by about 3 percent, according to meteorologist Joe Rao, SPACE.com’s skywatching columnist. This happens because the moon’s orbit is not perfectly circular.

CREDIT: Tim McCord

quantumaniac:

The Descriptive Camera

Matt Richardson created a camera which doesn’t deliver a photo but a description of the photo it made. Eh what? After the shutter button is pressed, the Descriptive Camera sends the photo to Amazons Mechanical Turk for processing. Somewhere someone receives this photo and writes a short description about what’s on the photo, that person receives a small payment for this task. As soon as that text comes back, a thermal printer outputs the result in the style of a polaroid print.
How cool is that!

quantumaniac:

Symmetree

quantumaniac:

Symmetree

staceythinx:

Art of Science by Stephen Gaeta. In this project, Gaeta uses passages from significant historical science texts to form his images.